Photos of the King Kamehameha Parade in Kailua-Kona

King Kamehameha Parade 2018 Kailua Kona

As the four of us sat on a lava wall waiting for the King Kamehameha Parade to reach Ali’i Drive in Kailua-Kona, my new-found friends and I listened to the announcers. This question bellowed down the street: Where was King Kamehameha born, literally? Some people shouted out Kohala, and others came up with different suggestions. Literally, the announcer stressed, literally.

OK, this Sacramento Realtor joked: on a bed of banana leaves. King Kamehameha was born into a royal family, best guess estimate of 1758. King Kamehameha Day is held annually to recognize the great ruler who was first to unite the islands. He died in May of 1819. Legends say King Kamehameha was born under Haley’s Comet. The announcer at the King Kamehameha Parade in Kailua-Kona seemed very certain he was born in a canoe. That was the correct answer.

The top photo on this page is at the Hulihe’e Palace, which was Queen Emma’s summer home, now managed by the Daughters of Hawaii. You can read more about Hulihe’e Palace and see photos of what happened after the King Kamehameha Parade tomorrow.

Bear in mind when you view the photographs below of the King Kamehameha Parade 2018 in Kailua-Kona, that each of the Pa’u riders (wahine) represent each of the 8 islands. Talk about dedication and hard work. These women have spent days getting ready for this parade, hand-making the pa’u (skirt) the traditional way, tying the waists by using kukui nuts, making leis.

As I mentioned to Linda, who lives down the street from me, I’ve come to learn that Hawaii is about destruction and reconstruction. They pick the flowers (destruction) and then reassemble the petals into leis (reconstruction). Much like the Puna District will rebuild after Pele finishes her say.

Here is a treat you should like. The colors for each Hawaii island are as follows:

Big Island: RED for the Lehua flower

Maui: PINK for the Lokelani Rose

Kahoolawe: GRAY for the Hinahina plant

Lanai: ORANGE for the Kaunaoa plant

Molokai: GREEN for Kukui nuts

Oahu: YELLOW  for the Llima flower

Kauai: PURPLE for the Mokihana berry

Ni’ihau: WHITE for the white Pupu shell

Each of the Pa’u riders is a princess, accompanied by an entourage. After the Pa’u rider has represented each of the 8 islands over the years, she qualifies to become the Queen. The Pa’u riders waved, sat regally astride (not sideways) on the horses, their skirts flowing over the horse and over their feet. They threw kisses to the crowds and showed Aloha.

King Kamehameha Parade 2018

The Daughters of Hawaii was established in 1903 by 7 women who were born in Hawaii as daughters of Presbyterian missionaries.

King Kamehameha Parade 2018

Horse rider announcing the Grand Marshall of King Kamehameha Parade.

King Kamehameha Parade 2018

The Grand Marshall of the King Kamehameha parade riding in the carriage is Alex Ako.

King Kamehameha Parade 2018

Many keiki (children) participated in the King Kamehameha Parade.

King Kamehameha Parade 2018

Pa’u Queen Ruby Pua ‘ala Ruiz Ahlo in the King Kamehameha Parade.

King Kamehameha Parade 2018

This might be the Kamehameha Schools Alumni Association but don’t hold me to it. Although she does seem to be holding a Target tote bag. Which perhaps represents all the money school teachers spend at Target for school supplies, completely out of their own pockets, because the public school systems seem to never fully support their teachers. But I’m just making up shit. Perhaps she has lunch in that Target tote.

King Kamehameha Parade 2018

Keiki carrying the flag that announces the Princess of Hawai’i (Big Island).

King Kamehameha Parade 2018

Princess Melanie Moses represents the Hawai’i Island in the King Kamehameha Parade.

King Kamehameha Parade 2018

Part of the constituency I believe for the Princess of Hawai’i.

King Kamehameha Parade 2018

Princess Trisha Medeiros represents the island of Maui in the King Kamehameha Parade.

King Kamehameha Parade 2018

OK, this is where I mostly missed photos of the Pa’u riders for several islands because a potential seller had just emailed me to say yes, he wants to list his home in Natomas with me. He was eager to schedule my professional photographer immediately. I looked down at my phone to send my photographer an email, begging him to schedule us for Monday even though his schedule was full. Could not operate my camera and my email simultaneously, no way.

When I sent the email, I was able to capture this photo of Princess Heather Hooper representing the island of Kaua’i in the King Kamehameha Parade. Later, my photographer, wonderful guy that he is, texted to say we were on for Monday for photos. Who says one can’t sell Sacramento real estate while living part-time in Hawaii? Huh? Nobody, that’s who.

King Kamehameha Parade 2018

Here, Princess Shelby Tomita, representing the island of Moloka’i in the King Kamehameha Parade, shares Aloha with the crowd.

King Kamehameha Parade 2018

These Pa’u riders followed Princess Heather Hooper in the King Kamehameha Parade.

King Kamehameha Parade 2018

My favorite, because we all have a favorite, is Princess Cheyenne Fuerte, she is beautiful and represents the island of Lana’i in the King Kamehameha Parade.

King Kamehameha Parade 2018

Popolo Joe Shave Ice & Ice Cream participated in the King Kamehameha Parade. Why? Because they can. Why not? This is why I love Hawaii!

King Kamehameha Parade 2018

This could be the Aloha Keiki Run, I believe, but I could be wrong on this one, too. Cute pony, though.

King Kamehameha Parade 2018

The last float in the King Kamehameha Parade represents the Tonga community. I know what women are thinking: hubba, hubba.

King Kamehameha Parade 2018

Sneaky shot of me. To my right is Linda Lynn (who recently moved to Big Island from Roseville, a suburb of Sacramento), Erin (who will be teaching 2nd grade) and dog groomer Laura, who is an absolute hoot. Come back tomorrow for more photos from the Hulihe’e Palace celebration after the King Kamehameha Parade.

Photos by Elizabeth Weintraub, iPhone

Elizabeth Weintraub

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