Buying Sacramento Home

February 2021 Sacramento Area Housing Market Update

February 2021 Sacramento Area Housing Market Update

February 2021 Sacramento Area Housing Market Update is a powerful overview of the market written by our own Josh Amolsch.  Buyers should understand they need to listen to their real estate professional to win.  — Enjoy, JaCi Wallace. Well, here we go again, a new episode of the Sacramento area housing update. The horror show is the modern buyer’s life and what keeps homeowners awake at night. At least the February 2021 Sacramento area housing market update numbers show some promise. New listings are up 2.4% from January but down 16.4% from February 2020. Inventory rose for the first time since October 2020, but only 7.7% from January, and was still not enough to replace the homes that went into escrow. I think March will see another down-tick in inventory, which means another record for median home prices. read more

February 2021 Sacramento Area Housing Market Update

The 2021 Fire Season

The 2021 Fire Season

The 2021 fire season is a timely topic for our weekly blog post, written by our very own Josh Amolsch. Enjoy! — JaCi.

Growing up, I remember four distinct seasons in California: spring, summer, fall and winter. It doesn’t really seem like that any longer. The seasons now just kind of run together, so it is either cold or bloody hot. The Sacramento mega-region housing market seems to be taking cues from the global warming conversation, too. The 2021 fire season is likely going to be just a continuation of the 2020 fire season, 2019 fire season, and so on. read more

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January 2021 Sacramento Area Housing Market

December 2020 Sacramento Area Housing Market

January 2021 Sacramento Area Housing Market, written by Josh Amolsch, is an informative eye-opener, Enjoy–JaCi Wallace.

Sacramento is officially in the big leagues. We have now reached a median home price that is only a couple clicks down the recent Kiplinger’s list from New York, Los Angeles, San Francisco, San Diego, San Jose, and two or three other high-end but still fairly obscure cities. Maybe those cities were cow towns once before as well. A place only good for getting gas and asking the wife, “so where are we at again?”. Yes, Sacramento reached a new high in January, a month where prices typically go down, and inventory goes up. January 2021, and all the vicious action therewithin, birthed a $449,000 median home price for Sacramento County, an 18.2% increase from Jan 2020. Placer County shot up 17.8% from a year ago to $581,000. read more

Request An Appraisal Waiver When Purchasing A Home

Request An Appraisal Waiver When Purchasing A Home

Request an appraisal waiver when purchasing a home, can help you win in this competitive market. I was showing my sister homes and we had lost on a previous offer to cash. We found another property and they had to write an offer well over the list price. They called their lender to ask if the appraisal could be waived. We were not in contract yet. My sister was putting 20% down and having to make up the price difference between offer and list price. They called their lender and asked to run the automated loan approval with an appraisal waiver. read more

Waking Up to a Tree in The Bedroom

Waking Up to a Tree in The Bedroom

Waking up to a tree in the bedroom is a timely blog for Sacramento real estate, given our power outages in the last 24 hours. Very well written by our very own, Josh Amolsch. Enjoy. — JaCi Wallace.

Well, what do you blog about the morning after an above-average storm that caused power to go out multiple times and downed trees all over the city? That’s right, disclosure and inspection advice. There is little worse than waking up to a tree in the bedroom; though the pessimist could rattle off a list of daily occurrences that would meet or exceed that traumatic experience. I didn’t have a tree fall on my house, but I know a few people that had trees fall on their property. I guess if you have a big enough property or a small enough tree, it wouldn’t be such a big deal. Just cut it up when you have time, stack it and use it for firewood next winter. Just make sure you check if you can burn that day. (http://www.airquality.org/Residents/Fireplaces-Wood-Stoves/Check-Before-You-Burn) read more

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